Moving Around, Resiliency, and Owning our Voice

Our next installment on the Hero’s Journey shows us how resilient we can all be. A close friend of mine has moved 16 times in her short 30 year life across three countries. As I prepare for my own journey abroad I feel dread at the upcoming changes and hope that I will be able to stick to my own values of frugality as Ai-Chan did. I also really admire her willingness to share with others and her kindness even when things were not going as well as she wished. This Hero’s journey will be a reverse one. I’ll start by bragging about her frugal super powers, the time her super powers couldn’t save her, and how all this moving may have affected her.

Ai-Chan and I met our first year of college as roommates. We hit it off really quickly and proceeded to continue to room together during our four years of undergrad in college. We often split groceries and did laundry together to keep costs low. We bonded over moving around a lot as kids and tubs of ice cream. Saving comes easy to Ai-Chan and she’s never been in consumer debt. In her own words she only has debt for the essentials: her car and student loans. Her student loans are on the ten year repayment plan so she’s due to be done with them very soon. It helps that her main hobby is free once you pay for basic utilities: Ai-Chan is a huge gamer and thinks nothing of spending an entire weekend at home.

Continue reading “Moving Around, Resiliency, and Owning our Voice”

Corinna’s Hero’s Journey – Reinventing into Retirement

Our first installment of the Hero’s Journey is Corinna’s reinvention into retirement. Corinna retired as a Secretary seven years ago from City government. Since that time she’s learned a lot about herself and gained a clearer understanding around her relationship with money. Continue reading “Corinna’s Hero’s Journey – Reinventing into Retirement”

Financial Hero’s Journey

Joseph Campbell is a scholar who studied ancient myths and developed the idea of the monomyth – The Hero’s Journey. The three part act of the monomyth is a way to understand how we all can change or improve what’s not working. This arc has been used in many settings, from Harry Potter to Star Wars. It was further publicized by Hollywood screenwriter Christopher Vogler; below is his well-known adaptation. Interestingly, the Hero’s Journey is also a recurrent theme in 12 step recovery shares: What it was like, What Happened, and What It’s Like Now.

http://dramatica.com/resources/articles/how-and-why-vogler-journey.gif

Every one of us has many iterations of this journey in our own life. Sometimes it has to do with a transformation on how we handle addiction (12 Steps), a difficult outside circumstance (Star Wars), or big money changes. In this series of blog posts I will be detailing out the experience of people who now have a flourishing relationship with money. I will treat the main three acts as follows:

  1. Recognition of a problem
  2. Confrontation of said problem
  3. Resolution of problem and triumphant return of hero

I would love to hear your stories for this! If you are interested in sharing your financial hero’s journey please leave a comment below.

To find out about my own Financial Hero’s Journey check out the following posts:

Alyssa Windell, another awesome financial blogger, wrote a great post connecting the hero’s journey and money here.

Why Hire a Financial Planner?

Although I’ve never hired a financial planner, I have had to hire an expert to help me do something I could potentially have done myself. Earlier this year I switched gyms and the new one had less exercise classes. After two years of either going to a class or doing cardio I had still not started weight lifting. I always had a reason to skip it. The truth was I didn’t know how. After some half-hearted attempts to learn I realized I was not disciplined enough to learn this skill on my own. The routines online confused me and my motivation barely lasted past five minutes.

Shortly after joining the new gym they offered me an introductory personal trainer session. At first I was an adamant no. At the time my main objections were that it’s expensive and it’s something I should be able to figure out on my on. But then I saw that I could afford it and realized that I was probably not going to learn it on my own. So I took the plunge and signed on for a one year contract. I can now happily say I am comfortable with my weight lifting routine. And a positive side effect is that my butt has never looked better!

So what does my personal trainer have to do with a financial planner? Both professions have experts who motivate you through behavioral changes. They have been trained to quickly spot possible problems. Plus the best coaches, either for fitness or finances, are just as excited about your success as you are. If it’s fear that’s holding you back, take a look at this great article by Michael F Kay from Financial Life Focus. Continue reading “Why Hire a Financial Planner?”